Radon Testing in Michigan

The home inspector can do the radon testing in conjunction with the home inspection or separate. Having the radon test done together with the house inspection can save you some money. For inspection cost visit our home inspection fees page.

Overview of radon

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas. You can’t see radon. And you can’t smell it or taste it. It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Your home traps radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.

 

 Major Radon Entry Points:

  • Cracks in concrete slabs.
  • Spaces behind brick veneer walls that rest on uncapped hollow-block foundations.
  • Pores and cracks in concrete blocks.
  • Floor-wall joints.
  • Exposed soil, as in a sump or crawl space.
  • Weeping (drain) tile, if drained to an open sump.
  • Mortar joints.
  • Loose fitting pipe penetrations.
  • Open tops of block walls.
  • Building materials, such as brick, concrete, rock.
  • Well water

 

Radon is estimated to cause many thousands of deaths each year. That’s because when you breathe air containing radon, you can get lung cancer. In fact, the Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

 

You should test for radon.

Radon testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon. EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon. EPA also recommends testing in schools.

Radon Testing is inexpensive and easy — Call us to schedule a Radon Testing.

 

Radon problems can be fixed

Radon reduction systems work and they are not too costly. Some radon reduction systems can reduce radon levels in your home by up to 99%. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels.

The cost of reducing radon in your home depends on how your home was built and the extent of the radon problem. Most homes can be fixed for about the same cost as other common home repairs. The cost to fix can vary widely; consult with your state radon office or get one or more estimates from qualified mitigators. Picking someone to fix your radon problem is much like choosing a contractor for other home repairs – you may want to get references and more than one estimate.

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About the Home Inspector
Dan Joandrea

- I have been working in the home remodeling / construction industry for over 11 years. I have decided to open a home inspection company to help real estate home buyers to make an informed decision before making their biggest investment of their life. The home inspection is a very important step when purchasing a home.